/toolsthe n is 20017 Rodenticide Toxicity | Rum River Veterinary Clinic, Anoka MN

Rodenticide Toxicity

Published: 12/4/2019

As of 2015, all rodentacides sold on the US consumer market meet regulations set forth by an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) policy aimed at mitigating rodenticide exposure to humans and non-targeted species, including companion animals. This policy resulted in the removal of all residential second generation anticoagulant rodenticides from the consumer market (agricultural and restricted use by liscensed operators is still permitted. As a direct consequence, there has been a dramatic increase in theproduction and sales of non-anticoagulant rodenticides, specifically bromethalin and cholecalciferol. BROMETHALIN: Most commercial brands of bromethalin baits contain 0.01% concentration. Doses greater than 0.1 mg/kg necessitate treatment in dogs. Experts consider cats to be three times as sensitive as dogs to bromethalin, so any dose in cats necessitates treatment. Bromethalin is a neurotoxin. There is no antidote for this poison. Call your veterinarian immediately if you think your pet has been exposed. Time is of the essence in a case of bromethalin poisoning. Treatment must be done as soon as possible and includes vomiting and giving activated charcoal to absorb the toxin. Signs of toxicity are convulsions and paralysis. Once signs begin, treatment is very difficult and most patients die. CHOLECALCIFEROL: Most commercial cholecalciferol containing baits have concentration of 0.075%. Doses greater than 0.1 mg/kg necessitate treatment for both dogs and cats. Chlolecalciferol increases intestinal absorption of calcium, stimulates bone resorption, and enhances renal tubular resorption of calcium. This results in a blood serum calcium increase. Prolonged elevation of serum calcium can lead to soft tissue mineralization resulting in acute renal (kidney) failure and cardiovascular abnormalities. There is no antidote. Call your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has been exposed. Rapid treatment improves the prognosis in cases of cholecalciferol poisoning. Treatment includes vomiting and giving activated charcoal to absorb the toxin. Signs of toxicity are typically delayed onset and usually observed 18-36 hours post-ingestion.The most common signs of toxicity include vomiting, diarrhea, inappetence, depression/lethargy, and increased thirst and urination. PREVENTIVE MEASURES: Keep all rodenticides out of reach of pets. Know which toxin is contained in the brand of rodenticide used in your home. If your pet is exposed, get treatment immediately. Pet Poison Control 1-800-764-7661 www.http.petpoisonhelpline.com A $59 incident fee applies

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